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This topic contains 14 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Profile Photo alwaysworried 10 months ago.

  • Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Profile Photo
    Participant
    leahb

    hi anyone have experience with pure o and exposure treatment?

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    Hey leahb, I do know a bit about ocd and from what i know pure o is not so recognized anymore, as there is most often a compulsion even if its in the thoughts. If you can give some more detail i may be able to help further. There is so much new research on ocd treatment and exposure is definitely an option but it depends on how its done and how you and potential therapist frame the exposure. Basically, accepting and provocatively engaging in the obsessions and not engaging in physical or mental compulsions is proven to help.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Chavy

    Basically, accepting and provocatively engaging in the obsessions and not engaging in physical or mental compulsions is proven to help.

    Just to clarify, when you say Provocatively engaging in obsessions, you mean to engage in it, or to accept it and not engage in it?

    Leahb, as alwaysworried wrote, most times, the obsessions come with the compulsions.  Do you want to elaborate more on what form the Pure O takes?

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    leahb
    Topic Author

    Yes. That’s the concept of exposure and response prevention treatment. It’s a very hard treatment. Pure o is the same as all ocd. I have a LOT of mental compulsions.

     

    My form of ocd is classic relationship ocd but in general the hallmark of all ocd is the extreme discomfort woth uncertainty. It leaves,me feeling so crazed I dont even know what to do woth myself.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    Yes. I totally hear you leann, it can be extremely painful until you learn how to deal with it and even then it may come and go in waves but you will get there and it will get much easier.

    I wasn’t so clear, ill try to clarify.

    By provocatively engaging I mean that you let the thoughts come on and even bring them on and even if it causes extreme anxiety you let that come on as well and wait for the climax to pass. like this you train your mind and body not to fear the obsessive thoughts and not need the compulsive thoughts to make things feel just right.

    I’ll try to use relationship obsession thoughts as an example but i may be way off with your particular issue so forgive me but i hope the concept will still ring true.

    For instance, if the obsessive thoughts are “what does she think of me, why doesn’t she text back, does she like me, is she mad at me, I can’t believe I’m obsessing about this, I’m crazy,  etc etc..” then the compulsive thoughts to reduce that may be “It’s ok she’s probably busy, she for sure still likes me, I didn’t really do anything to make her upset, I’m working on getting these thoughts away, I hope they will just leave etc etc.”

    Rather- When having the obsessive thoughts say “yes these are thoughts, maybe they’re true, maybe they’re not, I don’t need to get them away, they can stay all they want, I will still continue doing what I’m doing while they wobble and babble around in my head. I can live and thrive with uncertainty, I can live and thrive with having these thoughts, the crazier they are the better.”

    That’s provocative. Thats showing the ocd you’re boss and it’s not! When you’re reaction to the thoughts increases the anxiety, you know you are not compulsing but rather using some exposure.

    Also, what i think is helpful is trying to identifying what this ocd is preventing you from exploring. Perhaps an underlying issue totally unrelated to the ocd and the ocd is just the red herring. I think that can be helpful as well. Like this you are looking at this ocd as a distraction and not defining who you are in any way.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    leahb
    Topic Author

    Always worried,

    Thanks. Do you have ocd? You seem to know a lot about it.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    sure.

    Not personally but I’ve helped a close relative with the struggle so am somewhat familiar…

    Has anything i shared ring true for you?

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    EB

    Hi All:

    I just wanted to chime in here, echoing some things mentioned previously, as well as adding in some new thoughts.

     

    1) The first thing to recognize that OCD is super common! Especially in the Frum community, the only reason we don’t know that is because people like to hide it more than share it in our community (we aim to change that.)

    2) A very helpful line is that, “it’s not ME, it’s my OCD”. This means that thoughts come from a million different places. Most people will have disturbing thoughts at some point, the difference with OCD, is that you tend to obsess on those thoughts. But just because a thought pops in to our head (let’s say you had a scary thought about something bad happening) does not mean that it comes from your essence. There is nothing to feel guilty about, as it is not YOU who put the thought there, it could have come from any number of things. Ex

    A nightmare about a monkey can be because

    he saw a monkey in the zoo during the day, or saw a documentary with monkeys. This does not mean that his dream is true,, they are just meaningless thoughts.

    3) FORGIVE YOURSELF, DON’T BE OCD ABOUT YOUR OCD.

    What I mean by this is that the tendency when working on OCD, and trying not to obsess is that when one obsesses they feel like they lost. This is completely NOT true.

    It is a process that does not happen overnight. If one obsesses about something 6 times that day instead of 7, that is a big win!! It is the baby steps which will get you the long term results. If one day  a 7th time happens it is okay.

    Remember it is not a sprint, it is a marathon.

    Set short term goals one mile at a time. And view each one as an accomplishment. If you falter on one mile, that is fine and expected! Pick yourself back up, and continue the marathon.

    As long as you are generally moving forward you are doing great!!!

    Please let me know if this helps.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Chavy

    Wow! Such good points here! I like the point you made about a thought being just a thought. I have a hard time taking a thought as just a thought and not obsessing over it. I also really like your line: This is NOT me; it’s my OCD.

    Thank you for chiming in!

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    EB

    That line is from a book, and happy to help. Feel free to ask any other questions. A lot of heartache and pain can be saved when these issues are dealt with in the right way.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    thank you so much for that post. It was so clear and i especially liked point 3. I also feel like the goal is not to lessen the obsession but rather to lessen our aggravation that is caused by it. Thanks for chiming in.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    EB

    My pleasure. I feel that it is not mutually exclusive. One can work on trying to lessen their obsession (one step at a time). And simultaneously can work on not letting the obsessions aggravate you.

    Thanks.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    Thanks @EB that makes sense. I think for some people working to lessen the obsession makes the obsession worse so i guess looking at it on individual basis is ideal but i can see how working on both would be helpful in many cases.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    EB

    @always worried:

    One hundred percent!

    Most things are subjective to the person, if something is working for you, stick to it!!!

    There is no one answer for all, there are many different answers, and each should use their own path if it works for them.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    agreed, Thank you for that reminder @EB

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