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This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Profile Photo Mitchell 2 weeks ago.

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    Participant
    Rafa18

    When thinking about dating, (as someone with a past and/or present experience with mental health challenges) how should one consider the possible reality that one would feel more comfortable talking about/growing with a partner that has also faced mental health challenges? Obviously, just because two people can connect and share over the arena of mental health, doesn’t mean that they are right for each other (and someone without a mental health challenge could potentially be great in supporting you and even more compassionate than someone dealing with their own “stuff”), but as a young professional male “in the parsha” with a history of Pure O OCD/intrusive thoughts, I kind of wish there was a way to connect people that feel self conscious/vulnerable about their mental health so the weighty topic of disclosure and the feeling of hiddenness/secrecy could be lessened.

    Also, this question about support goes beyond dating and spills into the potential role of peer support in the Jewish community, which I’ve found is sometimes hard to find outside of a virtual setting.

    Please let me know what y’all think about this?

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Mitchell

    Hi Rafa18, this is a great question and one that I know a lot of us here are dealing with. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wanting to date someone who’s gone through the same challenges as you. As long as you both use it as an opportunity to support each other and grow, I don’t think there’s a problem with dating someone who’s gone through similar mental health challenges. That being said, everyone has had challenges and vulnerabilities that they hide from others, so even if someone hasn’t gone through issues with their mental health, you will still have plenty to connect about! I think has long as the person/relationship is healthy and right, you can’t go wrong one way or the other.

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