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This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Profile Photo alwaysworried 1 week ago.

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  • Profile Photo
    Participant
    Chavy

    Hi all,

    I’m trying to lose some weight by trying to mindfully eat healthier, but there are so many challenges especially on Shabbos (Saturday). There’s usually tonz of food around (when we have company) and our meals are very very long. Sometimes we’ll have 4 challahs, 2 for each meal and then dips and sides with mains. I also find it very hard to stay seated bc i’m not really interested in the conversations, so i usually just go back to my books or magazines. Getting back to the eating, i try telling myself that I’ll only have 2 pieces of challah, and that mostly did work for this past Shabbos. But there’s tonz of other foods around and I have an obsession with food. I feel bloated after I eat and feel so heavy. (I’m on meds for a thyroid issue). I’m not sure if my post is coherent (bc it isn’t so clear in my mind), but I’m wondering if anyone has any tips for mindfully eating healthy when there’s tonz of food in sight.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Banana

    Hi Chavy,

    I can totally relate to your struggle! I tend to overeat on Shabbos as well. When there’s so much food in sight, I want to eat everything – not just because it’s delicious – but because I don’t want to miss out on the opportunity (this might be an additional slight mutation to my issue that I have and you don’t). So I try to think like a successful businessman and tell myself that I’ve already experienced all this food before – so let me try to choose just what I really love most (best bang for my buck) and what’s healthiest for my body (I’ve become very into eating healthy lately as I’ve come to observe that eating junk makes me feel like junk – and eating healthy usually digests better and keeps me feeling strong, healthy, skinny, good skin, etc.). I also try to eat slow and keep in mind all the food that’s still being served that I plan on eating. This is a weird one but I think it helps me a lot – I have delicious chocolate mint lentils on my table and I eat some of those and drink a ton of water during my meal. I think it really helps remove some of the tastes that make me want more challah etc.. and the water I think fills me up. However, I very often still end up feeling bloated even with all this. But I then convince myself that most of the bloating is all the water I drank. LOL. Would love to hear tips from others.

    Btw, this book may help. I started reading it.

    https://www.amazon.com/Your-Health-Torah-Healthy-Modern/dp/9659092326

    Good luck!

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Verified Pro
    Rachelle Feintuch-Heinemann

    I practice from an intuitive eating/HAES (Health At Every Size) perspective, which makes the whole idea of deliberate weight loss for the sake of being thin the issue in and of itself. When we tell ourselves we aren’t good enough and need to diet, all food becomes a lot more enticing as it is on the “do not eat” list. I understand the idea of health complications with being overweight and “doctor’s orders” to lose weight but I wonder how much more damage the anxiety and emotional energy attached can do to you than a bit extra weight. The idea of intuitive eating is that once we have learned to trust and appreciate our bodies, it’ll tell us exactly what it needs. The process of doing that is a bit difficult though. What I’d say about Shabbat meals when there is so much food around: make a plate of what you’d like to eat and eat that. Once you start with a bit of this and bit of that, things get complicated. Feed your body sufficiently, enjoy the challah, and tell yourself that when you are hungry again (it will happen soon enough) you will eat more. Another point is that often on Shabbat our meal schedule is off. If we miss breakfast, we are more hungry for lunch and tend to eat past fullness. Make sure to eat regularly in order to stay within the comfortable realm of hunger and fullness. Hope this is helpful!

    Rachelle

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    Participant
    Mitchell

    Chavy I completely see what you’re saying, Shabbat is different than the other days of the week, and the way we eat definitely feels that way. We these special little feasts on Friday nights, and when everyone else is eating a lot it can sometimes make you feel out of place to not join in with them. I think Rachel’s advice sounds great and could be really effective. A lot of the time we overeat it’s in that little window after we’ve eaten a normal meal but before our body processes it and realizes it’s full. Picking out what looks like a good portion and waiting a little to see if you get hungry again sounds like a great way to navigate around this.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Chavy
    Topic Author

    In response to Rachelle Feintuch-Heinemann's post #6158:

    I love this line of yours:

    When we tell ourselves we aren’t good enough and need to diet, all food becomes a lot more enticing as it is on the “do not eat” list. I understand the idea of health complications with being overweight and “doctor’s orders” to lose weight but I wonder how much more damage the anxiety and emotional energy attached can do to you than a bit extra weight. 

    It’s very very true! I also find that the energy expended in trying to stay away from the “bad” foods, just makes it more enticing and makes us feel worse. I’ve heard of intuitive eating and I really like the idea. I also do try to put whatever I want on my plate for the main course (a vegetable, protein (sometimes too much) and a carb. I would like to be more mindful of when I’m feeling full and not eat more than I need to.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    Chavy
    Topic Author

    In response to Mitchell's post #6160:

    Yes, that does sound like a good strategy. I also do feel a bit left out and feel the need to join in the “eating party” and inevitably end up eating even if I had planned not to. I try not to beat myself over that.

    Profile Photo
    Participant
    alwaysworried

    Feed your body sufficiently, enjoy the challah, and tell yourself that when you are hungry again (it will happen soon enough) you will eat more.

    I love this point. So simple yet so true. I can identify with this whole concept as well. It’s almost like there is this food overwhelm and we feel we are missing out if we don’t overindulge. I think it’s normal and healthy to allow indulgence but not to the point that you feel sick and awful. I also try to separate the “eating party”. Like there’s eating and there’s the party aspect of being and chatting with family and fiends. You can enjoy the party aspect even if you don’t eat every second.

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